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Blunting Effect
Boring
Carving
Certified Source
Comments
Common Names
Common Uses
Countries of Distribution
Cutting Resistance
Distribution Overview
Drying Defects
Ease of Drying
Environmental Profile
Family Name
Gluing
Grain
Heartwood Color
Kiln Drying Rate
Kiln Schedules
Luster
Mortising
Moulding
Movement in Service
Nailing
Natural Durability
Natural Growth Defects
Numerical Data
Odor
Painting
Planing
Plantation species?
Polishing
Product Sources
References
Regions of Distribution
Resistance to Impregnation
Resistance to Splitting
Response to Hand Tools
Routing & Recessing
Sanding
Sapwood Color
Scientific Name
Screwing
Steam Bending
Strength Properties
Substitutes
Texture
Trade Name
Tree Identification
Tree Size
Turning

Scientific Name
Pinus taeda

Trade Name
Loblolly pine

Family Name
Pinaceae

Wood Image 1

Wood Image 1

Common Names
Bassett pine, Foxtail pine, Indian pine, Loblolly pine, Longleaf pine, North Carolina pine, Oldfield pine, Pine, Pinho-teda, Swamp pine, Taeda pine, Torch pine, Yellow pine

Plantation species?
Yes

Regions of Distribution
Africa, Latin America, North America, Oceania and S.E. Asia

Countries of Distribution [VIEW MAP]
Brazil, New Zealand, South Africa, Uganda, United States, Uruguay, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Common Uses
Balsam, Balusters, Boxes and crates, Cabinetmaking, Chemical containers, Furniture, Joinery, Light construction, Paneling , Plywood, Poles, Pulp/Paper products, Railroad ties, Tool handles, Toys, Vats

Environmental Profile
Environmental status not officially assessed


Distribution Overview
Loblolly pine is native to fifteen southeastern states in the United States. Its range extends from southern New Jersey south to central Florida, west to eastern Texas, and north to the far southeastern region of Oklahama. It grows on various soil types, from deep, poorly drained flood plains to well-drained slopes of rolling, hilly uplands, and it often forms pure stands, usually on abandoned farmlands. It grows from sea level to an elevation of 1500 to 2000 feet (457 to 610 m).

Heartwood Color
Brown
Red
Yellow
Purple
Orange
Pale red to pink
Brown
White to cream
Upon exposure, matures to slightly darker color
Initially pink brown


Sapwood Color
Yellow
White
Grey
White to yellow
Not distinct from heartwood


Grain
Figure
Growth rings (figure)
Distinct (figure)
Straight
Even
Closed

Clear growth rings (figure)
Distinct figure
Straight
High figuring
Closed
Clear to knotty pattern ranges


Texture
Medium
Medium coarse to coarse
Fine
Even textured


Luster
Medium


Natural Growth Defects
Latex or other ducts


Natural Durability
Durable
Moderately durable
Sapwood is susceptible to wood staining fungal attack
Non durable
Pinworms (ambrosia beetles) are commonly present
Vulnerable to attack by powder-post beetles
Susceptible to marine borer attack
Susceptible to attack from termites (Isoptera)
Resistant to attack from powder post (Lyctid & Bostrychid) beetles
Resistant to attack from pinworms (ambrosia beetles)
Prone to stain
Perishable
Moderate resistance


Odor
No specific smell or taste


Kiln Schedules
UK=H US=T10D4S/T8D3S Fr=7
UK=E US=T6D2/T3D1 Fr=5


Drying Defects
Distortion
Checking
Splitting
Slight twist/warp
Tends to distort and check durin drying


Ease of Drying
Fairly Easy
Slowly
Reconditioning Treatement
Moderately Difficult to Difficult
Moderate
Should be controlled to prevent excessive degrade
Reported to dry


Kiln Drying Rate
Naturally dries at a moderate speed


Tree Identification
Bole/stem form is unknown
Bole/stem form is straight


Tree Size
Bole length is 0-10 m
Bole length is 10-20 m
Tree height is 10-20 m
Tree height is 30-40 m


Product Sources
Scots pine is available in long lengths at low prices, but clear grades are rather difficult to obtain in commercial quantities. In addition to domestic supplies, very large quantities of Scots pine timber are imported from northern Europe into England. The imported wood is known by the trade names 'redwood' or 'red deal'.

The following species in the database has similar properties to Scots pine:

Para rubbertree (Hevea brasiliensis)

Certified Source
Certified Source


Substitutes
Parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia) is as dense and strong.

Comments
Higher in density

More stable

Blunting Effect
Little


Boring
Fair to good results
Fairly easy to very easy
Responds well to boring


Carving
Fair to Good Results
Fairly Easy to Very Easy
Good results


Cutting Resistance
Easy to saw
Fairly Difficult to Very Difficult to saw
Moderate to saw


Gluing
Moderate gluing properties
Good gluing properties
Easy to glue


Mortising
Fair to Good Results
Fairly Easy to Very Easy
Good mortising properties


Moulding
Fair to Good Results
Fairly Easy to Very Easy
Generally easy moulding operations


Movement in Service
Excellent Stability - Small Movement
Fair to Good Stability - Medium Movement


Nailing
Difficult to nail
Nails hold poorly
Good nailing characteristics
Good nail holding properties


Planing
Fair to Good Results
Fairly Easy to Very Easy
Poor resistance to decay
Planes to a satisfactory finish
Works fairly well but some material may pick up during planning
Reduced cutting angle recommended


Resistance to Impregnation
Resistant sapwood
Resistant heartwood
Sapwood is permeable
Heartwood is moderately resistant
Fairly treatable with preservatives
Difficult to penetrate with preservatives


Resistance to Splitting
Poor


Response to Hand Tools
Easy to Work
Responds Readily
Fairly Difficult to Difficult to Work


Routing & Recessing
Fair to Good Results
Fairly Easy to Very Easy
Responds well to routing operations


Sanding
Fair to Good Results
Fairly Easy to Very Easy
Frequent sandpaper changes is usually necessary because of clogging by resin


Screwing
Screwing yields good results
Easy to screw
Good screwing properties
Good screw holding properties


Turning
Fairly Easy to Very Easy
Fair to Good Results
Very Good to Excellent Results
Works easily in turning and most machining operations


Steam Bending
Moderate


Painting
Satisfactory results
Good results


Polishing
Very Good to Excellent Results
Fairly Easy to Very Easy
Fairly good polishing characteristics


Strength Properties
Bending strength (MOR) = low
Modulus of Elasticity (stiffness) = very low
Max. crushing strength = low
Density (dry weight) = 23-30 lbs/cu. ft.
Shearing strength (parallel to grain) = low
Max. crushing strength = medium
Shrinkage, Tangential = moderate
Shrinkage, Radial = very small
Shrinkage, Radial = small
Shrinkage, Radial = moderate
Shearing strength (parallel to grain) = very low
Density (dry weight) = 31-37 lbs/cu. ft.
Shrinkage, Tangential = small
Hardness (side grain) = very soft
Density (dry weight) = 38-45 lbs/cu. ft.
Shrinkage, Tangential = very small
Shrinkage, Tangential = fairly large
Modulus of Elasticity (stiffness) = low
Hardness (side grain) = soft
Density (dry weight) = 15-22 lbs/cu. ft.
Toughness-Hammer drop (Impact Strength) = high
Toughness (total work) = low
Soft wood, with surfaces denting easily
Shrinkage, Tangential = large
Shrinkage, Radial = large
Shrinkage, Radial = fairly large
Crushing strength = high
Bending strength (MOR) = high


Numerical Data
ItemGreenDryEnglish
Bending Strength676811292psi
Crushing Strength382774psi
Density32lbs/ft3
Hardness645lbs
Impact Strength2942inches
Maximum Crushing Strength32096069psi
Shearing Strength1352psi
Stiffness124815371000 psi
Toughness190inch-lbs
Work to Maximum Load810inch-lbs/in3
Specific Gravity0.440.47
Weight3124lbs/ft3
Radial Shrinkage4%
Tangential Shrinkage6%
Volumetric Shrinkage12%
ItemGreenDryMetric
Bending Strength475793kg/cm2
Crushing Strength2654kg/cm2
Density512kg/m3
Hardness292kg
Impact Strength73106cm
Maximum Crushing Strength225426kg/cm2
Shearing Strength95kg/cm2
Stiffness871081000 kg/cm2
Toughness218cm-kg
Work to Maximum Load0.560.70cm-kg/cm3
Specific Gravity0.440.47
Weight496384kg/m3
Radial Shrinkage4%
Tangential Shrinkage6%

References
Boone, R.S., C.J. Kozlik, P.J. Bois and E.M. Wengert. 1988. Dry Kiln Schedules for Commercial Woods: Temperate and Tropical. United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, General Technical Report FPL-GTR-57, Madison, Wisconsin.

Kaiser, Jo-Ann. Wood of the Month: Southern Pine - The Commercial Name for 10 Species. Wood & Wood Products, June, 1991.

Little, E.L. 1980. The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Trees - Eastern Region. Published by Arthur A. Knopf, New York.

Mirov, N.T. 1967. The Genus PINUS. The Ronald Press Company, New York. LCC Card No. 67-14783.

NWFA. 1994. Wood Species Used in Flooring. Technical Publication No. A200. National Wood Flooring Association, Manchester, MO.

Panshin, A.J. and C. deZeeuw. 1980. Textbook of Wood Technology, 4th Edition. McGraw-Hill Series in Forest Resources. McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York.

USDA. 1987. Wood Handbook - Wood as an Engineering Material, Forest Service, Agriculture Handbook No. 72, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. 57,74,307,439,159,97,810,303,535,360

USDA. 1988. Dry Kiln Operators Manual, Preliminary Copy. Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin.








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