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Blunting Effect
Comments
Common Names
Common Uses
Countries of Distribution
Cutting Resistance
Distribution Overview
Drying Defects
Ease of Drying
Environmental Profile
Family Name
Gluing
Grain
Heartwood Color
Kiln Schedules
Light-Induced Color Change
Luster
Movement in Service
Nailing
Natural Durability
Numerical Data
Odor
Painting
Planing
Polishing
Product Sources
References
Regions of Distribution
Resistance to Impregnation
Response to Hand Tools
Sapwood Color
Scientific Name
Screwing
Staining
Steam Bending
Strength Properties
Texture
Toxicity
Trade Name
Tree Size
Turning
Varnishing
Veneering Qualities

Scientific Name
Prunus avium

Trade Name
European cherry

Family Name
Rosaceae

Wood Image 1

Common Names
Cerisier, Cherry, English cherry, European cherry, Fruit cherry, Gean, Kers, Kirsche, Mazzard, Merisier, Meurisier, Wild cherry

Regions of Distribution
Africa, Eastern Europe, Mediterranean Sea Region, Oceania and S.E. Asia, Western Europe

Countries of Distribution [VIEW MAP]
Russia, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom

Common Uses
Brush backs & handles, Cabinetmaking, Carvings, Chairs, Decorative veneer, Door, Furniture , Furniture, Joinery, Moldings, Musical instruments , Musical instruments, Paneling , Paneling, Plywood, Shuttles, Textile equipment, Toys, Turnery, Veneer, Veneer: decorative, Walking sticks

Environmental Profile
Status has not been officially assessed


Distribution Overview
One of over a hundred species belonging to the Prunus genus, P. avium is native to Britain and is also widely distributed in the forests of Europe from Norway eastwards, and extends into western Asia. In the United Kingdom, native to regions as far north as the Scottish border, but is only commonly found as a wild tree among the Beech forests of the southeastern chalk deposits. Cherry is also reported to have been successfully cultivated by many landowners on their private lands, because of its beautiful blossoms.

Heartwood Color
Yellow
Orange
Pale red to pink
Pale brown
Reddish brown
Greenish to greyish
Yellow to golden-yellow to orange
Brown
Reddish dark brown
Red
Darkens upon exposure

European cherry exhibits more color contrast than American black cherry (P. serotina ).

Sapwood Color
Yellow
Paler than heartwood
White to yellow
Well defined
Pinkish


Grain
Straight
Figure
Growth rings (figure)
Even
Closed
Other (figure)
Distinct (figure)
Wavy
Rays (figure)

Straight
Clear growth rings (figure)
Other figure
Wavy
Rays figure
Generally straight, but not always
Distinct figure
Butt end of logs may have irregular grain


Texture
Fine
Medium
Fine
Fine to medium
Medium
Fine and uniform


Luster
Low
Lustrous


Natural Durability
Durable
Non-resistant to powder post beetles
Susceptible to insect attack
Moderately durable
Resistant to attack from powder post (Lyctid & Bostrychid) beetles
Sapwood is vulnerable to attack by furniture beetles
Sapwood is resistant to powder-post beetle attack
Non durable
Moderately resistant to decay


Odor
No specific smell or taste


Light-Induced Color Change
Darker


Toxicity
Some toxic effects


Kiln Schedules
UK=A US=T2D4/T2D3 Fr=1
UK=E US=T6D2/T3D1 Fr=5


Drying Defects
Severe twisting/warping
Moderate twist/warp
Slight twist/warp
Moderate end spitting


Ease of Drying
Fairly Easy
Moderate
Easy
Requires considerable care to avoid degrade
Dries rapidly


Tree Size
Tree height is 10-20 m


Product Sources
European cherry is available in small sizes only, but limited quantities in the form of veneers can be purchased on the European market. Price is comparable to that of medium cost hardwoods.

Comments
General finishing qualities are rated as good

Blunting Effect
Medium effect
Blunting effect on machining is moderate


Cutting Resistance
Cutting Resistance with green wood is easy
Cutting Resistance with dry wood is easy
Cross-Cutting and narrow bandsawing are satisfactory


Gluing
Easy to glue
Good gluing properties


Movement in Service
Medium
Small
Seasoning requires special care for material tends to warp


Nailing
Very Good to Excellent Results
Fair to Good Results
Good nailing properties


Planing
Reduction of cutting angle recommended
Planes to a satisfactory finish
Areas of irregular grain tend to tear surfaces


Resistance to Impregnation
Resistant heartwood
Resistant sapwood
Heartwood is highly resistant


Response to Hand Tools
Easy to machine
Moderate working qualities


Screwing
Fair to Good Results


Turning
Fairly Easy to Very Easy
Good results
Excellent turning properties
Easy to turn
Easier with seasoned wood


Veneering Qualities
There is slight to moderate drying degrade and the potential for buckles and splits
Suitable for slicing
Easy to cut

Sliced into highly decorative veneers for furniture, doors, and wall paneling.

Steam Bending
Very good
Good


Painting
Fair to Good Results


Polishing
Fair to Good Results
Good results
Satisfactory results
Excellent results


Staining
Finish is generally good
Finish is generally satisfactory
Some surface degreasing may be required
Good staining characteristics


Varnishing
Fair to Good Results
Fairly Easy to Very Easy


Strength Properties
Density (dry weight) = 38-45 lbs/cu. ft.
Bending strength (MOR) = medium
Shearing strength (parallel to grain) = medium
Shrinkage, Tangential = large
Max. crushing strength = medium
Toughness (total work) = medium
Shrinkage, Tangential = moderate
Shrinkage, Radial = moderate
Shrinkage, Radial = fairly large
Hardness (side grain) = soft
Hardness (side grain) = medium
Density (dry weight) = 46-52 lbs/cu. ft.
Weight = moderate
Toughness-Hammer drop (Impact Strength) = medium
Toughness-Hammer drop (Impact Strength) = low
Toughness (total work) = high
Shrinkage, Tangential = fairly large
Shrinkage, Radial = very small
Shrinkage, Radial = small
Shearing strength (parallel to grain) = low
Shearing strength (parallel to grain) = high
Modulus of Elasticity (stiffness) = low
Max. crushing strength = high
Density (dry weight) = 31-37 lbs/cu. ft.


Numerical Data
ItemGreenDryEnglish
Bending Strength916714984psi
Density40lbs/ft3
Hardness1270lbs
Impact Strength4042inches
Maximum Crushing Strength39337061psi
Shearing Strength2174psi
Stiffness127715291000 psi
Toughness287inch-lbs
Work to Maximum Load1417inch-lbs/in3
Specific Gravity0.58
Weight3831lbs/ft3
Radial Shrinkage4%
Tangential Shrinkage9%
ItemGreenDryMetric
Bending Strength6441053kg/cm2
Density641kg/m3
Hardness576kg
Impact Strength101106cm
Maximum Crushing Strength276496kg/cm2
Shearing Strength152kg/cm2
Stiffness891071000 kg/cm2
Toughness330cm-kg
Work to Maximum Load0.981.19cm-kg/cm3
Specific Gravity0.58
Weight608496kg/m3
Radial Shrinkage4%

References
Armstrong, F.H.,1960,The Strength Properties of Timber,Forest Products Research Laboratory, London Bulletin,No.45

British Woodworking Federation. 1995. Which Wood . Published by the British Woodworking Federation, Broadway House, Tothill Street, London.

Brown, W.H.,1978,Timbers of the World, No. 6 Europe,TRADA, Red Booklet Series

Clifford, N.,1957,Timber Identification for the Builder and Architect,Leonard Hill (Books) LTD. London

Farmer, R.H.,1972,Handbook of Hardwoods,HMSO

Findlay, W.P.K.,1975,Timber: Properties and Uses,Crosby Lockwood Staples London,224PP

Forest Products Research Laboratory, U.K.,1937,A Handbook of Home-Grown Timbers,HMSO

Forest Products Research Laboratory, U.K.,1967,The Steam Bending Properties of various timbers,Forest Products Research Laboratory, Princes Risborough, Leaflet,No.45

Forest Products Research Laboratory, U.K.,1969,The Movement of Timbers,Forest Products Research Laboratory, Princes Risborough Technical Note,No.38

Forests Products Research Laboratory, U.K.,1956,A Handbook of Hardwoods,Forest Products Research Laboratory, Princes Risborough, Department of,Science and Industrial Research, Building Research Establishment

HMSO. 1981. Handbook of Hardwoods, 2nd Edition. Revised by R.H. Farmer. Department of the Environment, Building Research Establishment, Princes Risborough Laboratory, Princes Risborough, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire.

HMSO. 1985. Broadleaves. Forestry Commission Booklet No. 20. Text by H.E. Edlin. Revised by A.F. Mitchell. Forestry Commission, Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London.

Howard, A.L.,1948,A Manual of Timbers of the World.,Macmillan & Co. Ltd. London 3rd ed.

I.U.F.R.O.,1973,Veneer Species of the World,Assembled at F.P.L. Madison on behalf of I.U.F.R.O. Working Party on,Slicing and Veneer Cutting

Kloot, N.H., Bolza, E.,1961,Properties of Timbers Imported into Australia,C.S.I.R.O. Forest Products Division Technological Paper,No.12

Kribs, D.A.,1950,Commercial and Foreign Woods on the American Market (a manual to their,structure, identification, uses and distribution,U.S.A. Penn. State College, Tropical Woods Laboratory

Laidlaw, W.B.R. 1960. Guide to British Hardwoods. Published by Leonard Hill [Books] Limited, 9 Eden Street, N.W.1, London.

Lavers, G.M. 1969. The Strength Properties of Timbers. Forest Products Research Bulletin, No. 50 (Second Edition, Metric Units). Ministry of Technology, Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London.

Lavers, G.M.,1983,The Strength Properties of Timber (3rd ed. revised Moore G.L.,Forest Products Research Laboratory, Princes Risborough, Building Research,Establishment Report (formerly Bulletin No.50)

Lincoln, W.A. 1986. World Woods in Color. Linden Publishing Co. Inc. Fresno, California.

Nairn, P.M., Editor. 1936. Wood Specimens - 100 Reproductions in Color - A Series of Selected Timbers Reproduced in Natural Color with Introduction and Annotations by H.A. Cox. The Nema Press, Proprietors of Wood, London.

Patterson, D. 1988. Commercial Timbers of the World. Fifth Edition. Gower Technical Press, Aldershot, UK. ix + 339 pp.

Patterson, D.,1988,Commercial Timbers of the World, 5th Edition,Gower Technical Press

Rendle, B.J.,1969,World Timbers (3 Vols.,Ernest Benn Ltd. London

Rijsdijk, L.F. and Laming, P.B.,1994,Physical and Related Properties of 145 Timbers, Information for,Practice,TNO Building and Construction Research Centre for Timber Research Kluwer,Academic Publishers

Timber Development Association Ltd.,1955,World Timbers (3 Vols.,Timber Development Association Ltd.

Titmuss, F.H. 1965. Commercial Timbers of the World. Third Edition (Enlarged of A ConRussiae Encyclopedia of World Timbers). The Technical Press Ltd., London.

Titmuss, F.H.,1965,Commercial Timbers of the World,Technical Press Ltd., London, 3rd edition

Wood, A.D.,1963,Plywoods of the World: Their Development, Manufacture and,Application,Johnston & Bacon Ltd. Edinburgh & London








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